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A Handful of Ideas for Boosting Your Swimming Potential in a Triathlon

Posted On : Oct-12-2010 | seen (577) times | Article Word Count : 531 |

It does not take a very trained eye to see that great swimmers are far and few between, a consequence of poor physical education standards and lack of dedication to weed out bad habits that can plague even the most talented athlete. That is why it is critical to boost your swimming capability before the race.
The key to successfully getting through a triathlon lies in balancing your skills at all three component disciplines so that there is no major drag on your energy, psychology or motivation. While running and cycling have their ins and outs that should be researched and polished before the big race, it is swimming that ranks as the most technical in this threesome. It does not take a very trained eye to see that great swimmers are far and few between, a consequence of poor physical education standards and lack of dedication to weed out bad habits that can plague even the most talented athlete. That is why it is critical to boost your swimming capability before the race.

Some technical glitches are as widespread as they can only get. For example, most swimmers are tempted to throw their hands as far ahead in the air as possible, thinking perhaps that it can win them speed and save energy. In the end, the air is less dense and more aerodynamic than water. However, the best practice in terms of optimizing the physics of your stroke is to drive your hand under at about the line of your goggles. Another thing is your head, which most swimmers would be well-advised to hold deeper inside water, rather than stick its large part out. On top of being generously immersed, it should also be directed straight down, and not ahead as some believe. This is not only more aerodynamic, but also relaxes your backbone, which is a major health consideration and a way to conserve energy.

Other tips from swimming experts include making sure that your pull move under water goes all the way towards you hips and the biggest acceleration is used while your hand is still under the surface. Only then can you focus on recovery. As for legs, kicking well is not necessarily kicking very hard. The reason why is that your lower body is responsible as much for picking up speed as it is for retaining balance. If you overdo your leg moves, you risk going a little unstable, to say nothing of how the effort put in it can eat into your energy reserves.

For some trainers swimming is indeed all about breathing. It is essential that you work towards achieving better coordination between your body movement and breathing patters. There is little point in trying to strain you lungs too much. They do not have to made of steel, but you should be able to use their potential wisely. Consult training programs for the most optimal settings for you. Optimizing lungs is tightly connected with something that might be called water feel factor. Your body has to adjust to the physical conditions of water reservoirs every time you go for a swim and to make this transition easier, you should avoid longer breaks from swimming. The same might be true about other disciplines – hanging away your cycling apparel for too long can bring about the same shock comeback.

Finally, use the community spirit (message boards, forums, webcam blogs) to imbibe other people's experiences and share yours. No one likes going it alone.

Article Source : http://www.articleseen.com/Article_A Handful of Ideas for Boosting Your Swimming Potential in a Triathlon_37308.aspx

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I am a web designer, a passionate writer and a Harley rental enthusiast. I write articles about sport and sport equipment like cycling apparel. I am also a computer specialist writing about accessories like mini mouse or webcam.

Keywords : cycling apparel, webcam,

Category : Recreation and Sports : Recreation and Sports

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